The benefits of being ordinary: A photo blog

Every Wednesday night, Lee and I have a date night. During the last few weeks, we made our way to REI and stocked up on all things camping and glamping. With a roomy sleeping bag and sleeping pad in tow, we made our way to Lake Murray in Oklahoma. I had moderate expectations for this weekend, but I'll admit I was a little nervous about having nothing to do in the middle of nowhere.

Luckily for me, Georgia was in particularly high spirits. We took in the fresh air together, and soon it was all things singing birds, fresh dirt and North Face.

Luckily for me, Georgia was in particularly high spirits. We took in the fresh air together, and soon it was all things singing birds, fresh dirt and North Face.

Within no time, Lee had worked his magic on a camp site and I helped by looking pretty and testing out the hammock. Please note the genius setup: hanging lanterns to light the path to the tent; hanging water container for easy bottle filling; even branches stood in for a key spot, leash holder and more.

Within no time, Lee had worked his magic on a camp site and I helped by looking pretty and testing out the hammock. Please note the genius setup: hanging lanterns to light the path to the tent; hanging water container for easy bottle filling; even branches stood in for a key spot, leash holder and more.

I took care of the important things, like making sure the  camping wine carafe  made it one piece.

I took care of the important things, like making sure the camping wine carafe made it one piece.

I also made it a point to pack cubes of gouda cheese (goes well with the Malbec I packed!), prosciutto and garlic-stuffed olives. Cheese and meat and olive board? This is how we camp. Lee smiled a lot as I made this.

I also made it a point to pack cubes of gouda cheese (goes well with the Malbec I packed!), prosciutto and garlic-stuffed olives. Cheese and meat and olive board? This is how we camp. Lee smiled a lot as I made this.

Georgia never acclimated to having a 30-foot rope, so we eventually tested her and she followed an invisible line in the woods. We had a  flashing collar  on her to be safe. How 'bout that hammock in the background, y'all?

Georgia never acclimated to having a 30-foot rope, so we eventually tested her and she followed an invisible line in the woods. We had a flashing collar on her to be safe. How 'bout that hammock in the background, y'all?

Near our camp site was a long pier. You can't see it, but in the thick of these trees was our hidden oasis.

Near our camp site was a long pier. You can't see it, but in the thick of these trees was our hidden oasis.

Both mornings I walked to the edge of the pier and saw this. Calm waters, expansive space, tall trees.

Both mornings I walked to the edge of the pier and saw this. Calm waters, expansive space, tall trees.

Saturday night we used an iPhone app to find the constellations. Turns out, we also saw a planet.

Saturday night we used an iPhone app to find the constellations. Turns out, we also saw a planet.

The next day we went to town, bought some firewood, snacks and whiskey. The magic of our little space wasn't lost on us. Lee snagged this picture of me and Georgia.

The next day we went to town, bought some firewood, snacks and whiskey. The magic of our little space wasn't lost on us. Lee snagged this picture of me and Georgia.

I have a habit of thinking that the exotic, extraordinary things of the world are always beyond my reach.

Sometimes I wish I wasn't a (sort of) normal white girl from Dallas because normal people aren't shiny or interesting or fascinating to passersby. They are often overlooked and under appreciated, and I hate feeling that way.

But here, sitting on a perfectly normal dock, in perfectly lovely Oklahoma, I realized that in my search for the extraordinary, I often overlook what is truly beneficial. Two days off the grid (for the first time in probably 18 months) did more for me than I can calculate right now.

Ordinary and extraordinary people alike, at some point in the day, we all share the same sunset.